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11/12/2018

Skyelark of London -

Blog 16.St. Lucia on the horizon.After some amazing 2724 Nm miles we are 44 miles of our final destination, St. Lucia. And that has woken up Captains Dan and Em. The final commands of the totally worn out sailors, has been to fly anything from the Sail locker, that have any potential of increasing speed, by a fraction. This have now been up in the mast. Ropes everywhere and with a satisfied grin to their faces, Cap Dan and First mate Em took shelter in the saloon, whilst Skylark is flying towards St. Lucia on the Kite, staysail and Main sail. But I will be surprised if we get away so easy. More sails to be trimmed..The bet of the day is what time "Land Ohoj" is shouted out. Competition is as always hard, and close. The prior guessing of arrival did not find a winner to take the boat. read more...


11/12/2018

Makara of Exe - X Skippers for X Yacht Makara 57.15 N 14.32 W

There has been a wonderful sense of relief on Makara knowing that if we are becalmed we can motor the whole way to St Lucia. For the last few days we have been sailing through 'Squall Alley' and have experienced a few squalls during the day and, wishing to avoid any dramas at night, we have motor sailed through the night with the main sail down because then the only action required by the team on deck is to furl in the genoa if things get too hairy.After yesterday's mutiny Mike and I have been demoted to first and second mate by the new skippers Jerry and Georgia; we are now ex-skippers of an X-yacht. This however is great news for us because the skippers normally pay for drinks and dinner on arrival, tops up the diesel tanks and pays for any damage sustained during the passage so many. read more...


11/12/2018

Bimble - Day 16 'Bimble' log

‘A wild, fast night'So what a fabulous wild night……Yesterday we made the most of our wind in the daytime and powered across the ocean and achieved 182nm in 24 hours. We knew ‘early doors’ as yesterday dawned that we were going to have to make the most of the forecasted 18-23 knots in the absence of any asymmetric or light wind sails. The only way to get any ‘umph’ and much longed for speed and to pile on miles was to put out our two head sails and totally ‘GO" for it. So that is what we did totally, absolutely, dedicatedly…..and that took us through the night. Our 23knots then became 28 knots wind speed…. A sailing lifetime personal helming speed was recorded for Freyja at 17 knots SOG, At the time I was in the saloon making my brekkie when my cereal bowl flew across the floor, I. read more...


Bimble - Day 16 'Bimble' log
Bimble - Day 16 'Bimble' log
Bimble - Day 16 'Bimble' log
Bimble - Day 16 'Bimble' log
Bimble - Day 16 'Bimble' log
Bimble - Day 16 'Bimble' log
11/12/2018

In Tune - Tue 11th December. Whale ho!

After running all day yesterday with just genoa in 20-25 knot winds it eased to 17-18 knots, and with the forecast for easing winds further we decided to raise the Parasailor before dark. The wind did not ease, perhaps increased again. At 2 am we pulled it in with great work from Angela & Steve on the foredeck in particular. We set a new max. speed of 14.3 knots surfing down 4 metre swells. After that it was a slower but lot more comfortable night back under the genoa. A clear sky, starry, venus incredibly bright as usual, and it's nice to be getting some moon again in the early evening as the moon waxes. After breakfast we raised the Parasailor again in clear, sunny skies, and had a relatively smooth and pleasant morning sail. By afternoon, clouds returned, and occasional rain. read more...


11/12/2018

Hector - Tag 17 - aus der Kategorie Segeln: der Übersegler mit Positionen

16°36,1N 045°15,5WDer Übersegler ist nicht etwa ein Mensch, der überseglerische Kräfte hat, sondern die große Karte, die ihr auf dem Foto seht. Diese dient uns für vielerlei Zwecke. Auf der Karte ist der gesamte Atlantische Ozean abgebildet, von der Ausfahrt der Straße von Gibraltar (lang lang ist´s her) und den Kanarischen Inseln (beides rechts auf der Karte zu sehen) über die Kap Verden westlich der afrikanischen Küste und dem Senegal bis zu den karibischen Inselgruppen und sogar hinein ins karibische Meer im linken Teil der Karte. Würde man einen geraden Strich von Gran Canaria bis nach Saint Lucia ziehen, so würde die Strecke ca. 2.700 nautische Meilen (= 5.000 km) betragen. Eine Distanz von Deutschland ca. bis nach Dubai. Und die Distanz, die wir während der Atlantiküberquerung. read more...


Hector - Tag 17 - aus der Kategorie Segeln: der Übersegler mit Positionen
Hector - Tag 17 - aus der Kategorie Segeln: der Übersegler mit Positionen
Danica I - squalls on the radar
Danica I - squalls on the radar
Danica I - sunset and clouds all around us
Danica I - sunset and clouds all around us
11/12/2018

Danica I - Sailing Log

Day 17- Tuesday, December 11, 2018¢ Night Watch Report: o Challenging night :o Sailing with partially reefed genoa and storm jib, averaging about 5 knots in 18-23 knot winds and up to 28 knot gusts while trying to avoid squalls as much as possible with compromised rigo Wind direction was changing from ENE to ESE causing Danica to swing back and forth like in a washing machine among 3-4 m seaso 05:00 S/V PURPLE RAIN # 175 passed us on starboard side - they saw us on AIS, but our instruments did not register them. They contacted us by radio and we both turned on deck light for better visibility¢ Day sailing and Danica's Trip's distance o 12:00 noon - trip distance 2566 NM (109 NM in 24 hrs) o We fixed the distance meter this morning and if we continue sailing at 5 knots, we should be in. read more...


11/12/2018

Adagio (U.S.A.) #12 12/08-12/09 2018: Saturday/Sunday

#12: 12/0812/09 2018:Saturday/Sunday.Rocky and Bullwinkle ... Rocky Mountain High (or oysters) ... Rocky Balboa .. Rocky Road ice cream ....I'm just thinking of things other than the ride that are 'rocky' :)We've been adjusting course and sail set to keep apparent wind and so far we have been pretty fortunate to ~have~ wind, even if at some points it has been very little and very inconsistent.Still, we're doing OK and have marked a couple of "firsts" on this trip.This is now the longest leg we've ever sailed, and the longest time under sail without using the motor. Very cool indeed!I know that we would all like to try and see if we can compete the whole sail without lighting up the engine, but time will tell what happens when we get closer in to the islands and local effects get. read more...


11/12/2018

MR - Day 17: Surfing towards St. Lucia

After finishing our last plum cake today, the crew agreed that we should try to get to St. Lucia as fast as possible. The weather listened to our thoughts and we had perfect sailing conditions today. Supported by good swells and winds of 17-20 knots from the south-east our sailing vessel surfed across the Atlantic Ocean. We look forward to our last sailing day and are excited to see the Caribbean islands tomorrow.. read more...


11/12/2018

Excalibur - Excalibur - 8

Musings on an Atlantic crossing, 8Clare Pengally and the yellowshirts’ to-do list vs my to-do list:CP:Organise berthing for 300 boats and parties for 1000 sailorsLook after ocean-worn crewsCollate new research data on fresh produce survival ratesDraft doctoral thesis on Vegetable Preservation Methods for Ocean Passages (or Deep Space)Get 1000 more ARC t-shirts printed and through Caribbean customs before christmasGenerally be heroic and smile beautifully at everyone throughoutMe:Sit aboutLook at seaLook at sunsetLook at starsRead a bookSit aboutWait for fish to biteWatch tim sleepTweak sails unnecessarilySit aboutWonder why fish aren’t bitingWonder what it’s like to be a fishDo 5 sit-ups (low priority)Clean behind the stoveActually nah don’t bother with stoveAdmire new frecklesSit. read more...


11/12/2018

Excalibur - Excalibur - 7

Musings on an Atlantic crossing, 7The Night StalkThe skipper hunts(Thump)NoisesCreaks and clatters bangs and thwacksHeadtorch and pants(Thump)StalkingThuds and rattles crashes thumpsHis prey waits(-)QuietUntil his back is turned to thump againHe spies the book(Thump)PouncesWedges it beneath a seatThe tin, the boot(Thump)SilencedSaucepans smothered, teatowels stuffed round mugsHe cocks his ear(-)NothingVictorious he tiptoes back to bed (Thump)(Thump). read more...


11/12/2018

Glory - lagoon 42 log Day 17- sunrise shift

Today marks my 17th day at sea. I started this day like every other day: a beautiful sunrise and a good cup of French press coffee. Selfishly I do I the 6-9 AM shift each day ( and the 2100-2400...my crew then covers the day in 3 hour 1 man shifts and at night in pairs at 3 hours each: we are a total crew of 5). This allows me to greet each day and also to put the boat to bed each night. It also gives me 6 hours on uninterrupted sleep - theoretically! The sunrise is my reward each day. I think its nice that the reward comes early before the day even starts. It assumes that I am deserving. With St Lucia only 500 miles away and the end in sight we are appreciating each moment all the more. I sure will miss these views.Glen. read more...


10/12/2018

BattPack - Log Day 16- oops day 16 entry missed yesterday!

BattPack Log- Day 16 - 10th December - We are gallopingalong! Great job because we absolutely need this pace to get to St Lucia in timefor Rex's 14th birthday on the 14th December.  The dear boy has been atotal star onboard, but another day at sea for his celebrations simply isn't topof his agenda and I am wholeheartedly with him!! He will make the best ofwhatever situation we are presented with, but certainly getting to St Lucia,eating pizza, swimming and enjoying a change of scenery will be just what thedoctor ordered!!   184 miles in the last 24 hours- 535 left to go! We areon a direct course of 280 to St Lucia. The wind is high 25-30kts and theforecast remains as such for the next couple of days. The seas are huge againand after a couple of calm days, everyone is feeling. read more...


11/12/2018

Makara of Exe - Mutiny on the Makara

The arrival of the ARC fleet in St Lucia is a momentous occasion and now we are just 40 hours away, we are looking forward to meeting up with the crews that we encountered as we crossed the vast 40,000,000 square miles of Atlantic Ocean.The home truth about the ARC Rally is that the number one risk we face is not falling overboard, not mechanical or electrical failure, not even the dreaded squalls. It is falling out with our crew mates. Close confinement, 24 hour watch system, and ever present risks test our relationships to destruction. After the shambles of the joint captaincy of Makara, including the rhumb line - gate, sail rip - gate, and every other 'gate' incident, Georgia and Jerry, two plucky crew mates have assumed captaincy! They have coped with 32 knot squalls and are joint. read more...


11/12/2018

Theodora - Probably the last entry..

It has been a slow night with the wind speed dropping below fifteen knots which means we have struggled to keep over five knots of boat speed. At the time of writing this we are just over two hundred miles out from St Lucia which is between thirty and thirty six hours away.We have been chatting amongst ourselves about what has surprised us about the trip. The common themes are how well we have lived with lots of excellent fresh food for the vast majority of the trip. We still have three cakes left to eat before we arrive, quite a challenge and amazingly we have loads of chocolate left, quite astonishing. The second thing we have all been struck by is the almost complete lack of wildlife, apart from flying fish. We have seen dolphins twice in sixteen days, all of us expected much more.. read more...


11/12/2018

Jack Rowland Smith - Log Day 16 - the Joys of Sailing

Day 16 of the trip will go down as the day when if it could go wrong it will go wrong and we have learnt more lessons about ocean sailing.As I write this we have 275 miles to run but those who like numbers will notice that our day to day mile rate is significantly down, we have only run 105 miles since my last report having averaged 6.8 knots in the previous day’s ARC produced noon to noon averages.Two reasons for this significant drop in speed, wind direction and more breakages.A little more wildlife but not much to be honest.The odd bird looks at the boat as a potential resting place but I think word has got around about the sanity of the crew (well skipper) and they are giving us a very wide berth!!No dolphins either but the flying fish still come and visit with their delightful. read more...


11/12/2018

Degree of Latitude - Day 16 - Almost There!

Hello All,So we are down to the final few miles (relatively speaking anyway), right now we have just over 240 miles to run, so at current boat speed we should hopefully be in Rodney Bay in around 36 hours. As you might imagine, we are watching the wind and boat speed like a hawk, noting every increase (or decrease) and trying to calculate what impact it might have on our arrival time!On the domestic front, we finally had to get rid of the remaining leek and also half a dozen beetroot, so an impromtu game of deck rounders was required - all went well, however we are still finding bits of leek on the boat 24 hours later...Since dining has formed such a key element of this passage, Sunday evening required the appropriate meal, so the crew worked together and we produced a full Sunday. read more...


11/12/2018

Smoke and Roses - Understanding the Indian Oceans' Reputation

Logged 1380 Nautical Miles140 Hours Sailing 62.75 Hours Motoring8 Days 10 Hours 45 MinutesNovember 3 – 11Reunion to Richards Bay, South AfricaI expected this last offshore leg of the Indian Ocean to be the most challenging of our circumnavigation as we will sail nearly 1400 nautical miles from Reunion around the southern tip of Madagascar to Richards Bay, South Africa. We had very inconsistent weather during the 8 ½ day passage with lots of sail changes. From hot and sunny skies with no wind to grey skies, rain, lightening and squalls with 35 knots of wind.The first couple days were hot and sunny with no wind. I baked and cleaned while we were motoring.On the fourth evening while I was doing dishes, I heard Dan say “big wave”, suddenly everything went flying from starboard to port; tea. read more...


10/12/2018

Gauntlet of Tamar - Day 15 - free for all on the stores declared by quarter master

Hi allIts been a while since I've written the blog in favour of each of the crew having their turn. The last couple of days have seen some exceptional sailing conditions with winds of around 20kn, the swell height today has somewhat increased with a wave height of maybe 5 metres at its peak earlier today, the wavelength was shorter than previously experienced which has led to some spectacular surfing down the face of these waves as they pass, our top speed today was 11.7kn, not bad for a 25 year old boat. I also realised today that this year I've done more miles in the boat than in my car, that's a lot of hours when your average speed is 6kn! The crew are pulling together really well and the daily routines required to keep us going have become second nature, the rig checks have proved. read more...


10/12/2018

Gepetho - Tag 15 - Die Schokolade im Adventskalender schmilzt

Seit heute Nachmittag haben wir nur noch weniger als 500 nm vor uns, um St. Lucia zu erreichen. Bei einer Gesamtstrecke von rund 2800 nm ist das nur noch ein Katzensprung. Die vergangenen zwei Tage hatten wir weniger Wind als prognostiziert, aber nun machen wir wieder ordentlich Fahrt und Strecke. Das Kochen, Essen und Abwaschen bei 5 bft und ordentlich Schwell verbrauchen mehr Kalorien als wir zu uns nehmen, was wir mit dem Inhalt unseres Adventskalenders aber gut kompensieren ;).Viele liebe Grüße von der Crew der Gepetho. read more...


10/12/2018

Raritan – 12/9/18 – Day 15 – A “day off”

The previous few days have provided us with some drama and chores. Today we found steady winds of 12-16 knots and decided to take it easy. No spinnaker, an easy day of sailing primarily Westward with plenty of time for the crew to sleep, shower, read, or lounge in the cockpit and listed to music. In the morning we ticked past the 500 miles-to-go milestone, which felt significant. Our arrival in St. Lucia seems pretty likely to fall on Wednesday evening, and we’d like to do what we can to ensure we arrive before sunset. Many of the cockpit discussions revolved around what we will eat, drink, and do once we reach terra firma. Our relaxing day helped prepare us for a taxing night.As we get closer to the Caribbean, we find ourselves sailing through numerous squalls. A gust of cool air is the. read more...


10/12/2018

Theia of London - Day 15.2 | We're finished!

14.04.9N 060 57.8W@ 22:24:04UT 10/12/2018   Total Distance Sailed:2,946nm   Tune of the day: [insert]   Minkey called "LAND AHOY!" at 1800UT, then we had thebest sunset we've had all trip (photos to follow). Since then we've only gone andruddy done it! 2,946 nautical miles in 15 days 9 hours 24minutes and 04 seconds, Team Theia of London have crossed the finish linein Rodney Bay, St. Lucia. It's been a tough race with many highs and lows, so wethought we'd summerise with our personal highlights of therace:   Mark "Jags" Jagger Highest point - The massive dolphin pod that joinedus early on.   Lowest point - Blowing "Prince"up.  Mark "Minkey" Minkley Highest point - See a whale from the top of themast, surfing under the boat!. read more...


Theia of London - Day 15.2 | We're finished!
Theia of London - Day 15.2 | We're finished!
07/12/2014

Take Off - Our first squall

Although the full moon lit our way so gently last night was quite unsmoothdue to wind changes all the time. We suspected several squalls so the spinnakerwent up and down all night in prevention. However we seemed everytime to “miss”them. This morning was a grey morning, no sunrise from the sea and heavy cloudsahead of us. However the heavy clouds were all along the horizon so we thoughtit was just normal rain. We sailed through it, got a bit wet, the wind wassteady and we thought this was smooth. The wind started to blow stronger and wasup to 30 knots when it then dropped gently down to 17 knots. And from nowhere astrong wind hit the boat, Jörgen stearing had difficulties in answering the windand the broach was inevitable. And then came the real rain – just like pouringhundreds of. read more...


10/12/2018

Bimble - Day 15 Log

Day 15 Bimble LogWe are seriously on the move at last-with some real wind. When we were planning this adventure over the last few years Nina and I avidly watched various weather websites and read up to see how the Tradewinds operated taking in there direction and strength so we prepared the boat and ourselves for an expected continuous 15 to 25 knots. Well the wind finally arrived today after 2 weeks of not quite getting enough wind to help the boat to go at its true potential.In the last 12 hours we have done a 100 mile run hooray !! So by 3.00am we hope to have covered 200 miles in 24 hours -that's more like it….although no fishing at this speed.I will try and give you a snapshot of what is happening this moment on Bimble .We are all showing signs of being ready to reach land sooner. read more...


Bimble - Day 15 Bimble Log
Bimble - Day 15 Bimble Log
Bimble - Day 15 Bimble Log
Bimble - Day 15 Bimble Log
10/12/2018

One Life - Day 16 - Roller coaster ride

Less than 700nm left! Squalls were left and right last night. And quite the wind and associated wave action today, making it feel like a roller coaster ride all day long!  . read more...


One Life - Day 16 - Roller coaster ride
One Life - Day 16 - Roller coaster ride
10/12/2018

Skyelark of London -

Blog 15Butterfly SightingIt was just Unbelievable to see a flutter by so far from land, or perhaps it was just in a cocoon in the boat somewhere until today and emerged. The flying fish have also been pretty active though, thankfully, none landing on the boat today. Even if they do land in the boat they don't all get thrown back. Tonny used one on a lure. Today we caught 3 small fish, none for keeping. The crafty tuna keep eluding us.Dinner was a fantastic, spicy curry with chicken and sweet potato made by chef Chris and sous chef Tonny. All this followed by a stunning sunset due west in front of our bow.Overnight we had some abrupt big wind, handled readily by the fearless crew, and after and throughout the day nice steady breezes bringing us closer to St. Lucia. As I write this we are. read more...


10/12/2018

EH01 - The Final Days

  Mother nature is something that you cannot change but you can sure changeyour sails. It’s been a challenging 24-36 hours with inescapable heat, winddirection changes, gusts, lulls, odd angled waves and swell, rain, and squallafter squall. Just after we’ve spent 30 minutes of work taking down sails andputting up other sails, we’ve found ourselves putting it all back the way itwas. Our skills and patience have been tested. We’ve acquired a few more bruisesand the skin on our hands has toughened a little more. We may have slowed ourprogress in what feels like the final push to this finish line, but we all feelwe have put our best foot forward in these last miles. Yet in these final moments of our race we’ve had time to enjoy our lastsunset, the last supper together, the final starry. read more...


10/12/2018

Hector - Tag 16 - Crew Teil V (Interview mal anders)

16°54,5N 43°04,1WWer bisher aufmerksam mitgelesen hat, der wird feststellen, dass noch ein Crewmitglied in unserer Vorstellungsrunde fehlt, und zwar unser lieber Thomas. Der Mann an Bord, dem wir den größten Respekt zollen. Denn Thomas ist bis auf einen kurzen Törn mit seinem Vater vor vielen Jahren noch nie gesegelt. Und dann direkt mal mit einer Atlantiküberquerung anfangen, Hut ab! Gerne würden wir auch Thomas wie schon Markus zu seinen bisherigen Erfahrungen und Eindrücken interviewen. Das Problem ist nur - wenn er nicht gerade Wache hat, schläft oder chillt er :-) Da ich (Katrin) mir mit Thomas die Wachen teile, die Nächte lang werden, viel Zeit für Gespräche bleibt und der Wachpartner derjenige ist, den man aus der Crew am besten kennenlernt, glaube ich, Thomas mittlerweile schon. read more...


Hector - Tag 16 - Crew Teil V (Interview mal anders)
Hector - Tag 16 - Crew Teil V (Interview mal anders)
10/12/2018

In Tune - Mon 10th December. Another rough night

With winds 20 + knots an the occasional rain squall the seas have built to 3 - 4 metres; so it was windy, wet and rough last night. Angela saw a meteor on watch, but I'd hardly call it "showers" yet. In the morning, and checking the forecast showed the wind continuing, so we decided to continue to play safe and just run under the genoa. By late afternoon wind had dropped to about 16-17 knots, gradually decreasing, so we decided to raise the parasailor again for overnight. During the day saw lots of relaxing - yahtzee, reading, listening to "Endurance", fixing a couple of minor things. Geraldine was a bit off colour in the rougher seas. Since early morning the skies have cleared and rain squalls gone, so that's one positive. The highlight of the day was seeing another boat; the first we. read more...


Charisma - Tag 14 | Happy Birthday zum 2. Advent
Charisma - Tag 14 | Happy Birthday zum 2. Advent
10/12/2018

Charisma - Tag 14 | Happy Birthday zum 2. Advent

Tropische Hitze begleitet uns über den Tag, in der zweitenTageshälfte haben wir mit unseren knapp 190 qm Segelfläche besteSonnensegel, die uns Schatten spenden.Flappende SegelMit der Abenddämmerung bergen wir den Spi und fahren - mit weiterhinauf Steuerbord ausgebaumter Genua - in die Nacht. Der Wind istwechselhaft und instabil. Wir können nur bedingt Strecke machen und dieSegel flappen. Der Seegang steht in keinem Verhältnis zum schwächelndenWind. Die Segel schlagen und das Material leidet. Wir können das indieser Phase nicht verhindern, sind aber froh um die top Qualitätunserer Segel von T1.Alles Gute zum GeburtstagIn den frühen Morgenstunden stabilisiert sich der Wind und erreichtwieder unseren gewünschten NE-Passat mit 4-5 Beaufort. Heute ist der 2.Advent - vor allem aber hat unser. read more...


10/12/2018

Raritan - Raritan 12/8/18 Day 14 – A day of chores

Morning broke on the day marking our second week on the water, and we were of two minds: on the one hand, we were making good progress and the end was in sight; on the other, we’d lost our most powerful sail. The wind was beautiful, but the swell was still irksome.We set about some housekeeping in the morning before shifting into a bigger gear. Ian climbed up into the end of the boom to repair a fraying second reef line. We’d worn completely through the cover and it would snap if not repaired.After a jibe, we set the spinnaker and marched west. The increased sail power reduced the effect of the swell and everyone’s mood improved. Unfortunately, early in the afternoon, we discovered with a binocular inspection that we’d chafed through the spinnaker halyard at the top of the mast. We had. read more...


Mon Reve - Part III Paintings - Sailor
Mon Reve - Part III Paintings - Sailor
Mon Reve - Part III Paintings - Mon Reve
Mon Reve - Part III Paintings - Mon Reve
Mon Reve - Part III Paintings - Banana
Mon Reve - Part III Paintings - Banana
Mon Reve - Part III Paintings - Fish
Mon Reve - Part III Paintings - Fish
Mon Reve - Part III Paintings - Hook
Mon Reve - Part III Paintings - Hook
Mon Reve - Part III Paintings - Fish
Mon Reve - Part III Paintings - Fish
Mon Reve - Part III Paintings - Moon
Mon Reve - Part III Paintings - Moon
Mon Reve - Part III Paintings - Ocean
Mon Reve - Part III Paintings - Ocean

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