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13/03/2018

Mischief - A little bit of Mischief Log 5

Day 12 11 March 2018 Sunday. Mother's day; a salty dousing; Sat phone problems; clocks go back presents opportunities; heading to NZ!; official members of triple digit club. Happy Mother's Day to all Mum's out there! Last night the wind was up and down like a yo-yo with dark clouds covering the moon when it did eventually make an appearance. The boat has been really rocking along both literally and figuratively under poled out genoa and one reef in the main - we seem to be averaging around 8 knots like this and surfing to 11 knots; really uncomfortable though. Dave reefed in the genoa around 0430 in a big gust but this seemed to unbalance the rig so we shook it out again at 0830. We are now back to rounding up sharply on larger waves the remedy to which is holding on tight!I had a proper. read more...


12/03/2018

Blue Pearl - Pacific Ocean

If you want to find us start in the island of Santa Cruz, the Galapagos, travel 1845 nautical miles to the West South West to latitude 10 and look for a blue sailboat. That's us. If you want to give us a warm welcome somewhere, travel 1100 nautical miles further West to the Island of Hive Oa in the Marquesas archipelago and we should be arriving there in another week or so. Looking forward to seeing you.Yes, we will have sailed 2945 nm in about18-20 days. I think I'd mentioned in a previous blog that we'd been looking forward to a peaceful Pacific Ocean sail under blue skies with lazy long swells, forget it; it's been more like a ride across the Gulf Stream with some New England weather thrown in, a little warmer, of course, but nevertheless challenging. Quite an experience, but the crew. read more...


12/03/2018

Lexington - Captain Bob: 10*56'north. 58*30'west

We are smelling the barn more and more. Most of the boats will be in Grenada by today. Lexington, Solo and Zeeland will finish up the group. We still are enjoying consistent winds in the 20s and moderate 4-8 foot seas from the starboard. The seas give a lot of roll. All in all it is pleasant in the cockpit but a little rolly below. Below is for sailors only. If you have an opinion please comment. So I will toss out something that I have not resolved in my mind, that is using a preventer versus a boom break. Most people I see favor a preventer. There is no other boat with a boom brake. That being said, there have been some breakages on this trip using preventers. We ran the line inside the shrouds once. When we jibed the line bent the mast pulpit. One other boat had the preventer line. read more...


11/03/2018

Mischief - A little bit of Mischief Log 4

Day 11 Saturday 10 March 2018 Rock & roll; Squalls; Spinnaker pole makes a break for it; disturbing news from home.I might just retract that last statement regarding "Embrace and enjoy" the rolling as it really was rocking and rolling last night, not enjoyable at all and you are obliged to embrace it as what choice do you have? Was off watch 3-6 am and didn't sleep a wink. At one point I was resting along the side of the cabin as the boat broached on a wave. 0600 came on watch and almost immediately we rounded up twice in quick succession so put in a reef. Still achieving 7-8 knts but a bit more comfortable although not entirely! The wind seemed to be backing slightly so were headed further downwind on 264 degs. 0900 first squall of the day, 27+ knots true with a deluge of rain. As. read more...


11/03/2018

Air Power - Mar 10

We're about a little over 300 miles east of the Marquesas Islands. If I shot an arrow directly north, it would land somewhere in Juneau, Alaska. Even Hawaii is hundreds of miles west of our longitude. (we are 133 degrees W) Those degrees in the parenthesis mean that is how far west of 0 degrees (London Time), we are. Or, you could say we are 47 degrees east of the international dateline (180 degrees E/W of 0 degrees). Knowing this doesn't mean a whole lot unless you are delivering a pizza around the dateline. Go the wrong way, and you are either early or late.Speaking of food, we grilled our final two rib eye steaks we purchased in Panama. I think they came from the States because we paid for them in US dollars. Oh, of course, everything is Panama is paid for in US dollars. Only the. read more...


10/03/2018

Shepherd Moon - Rollercoaster diner

We passed the halfway mark yesterday. When we reached the halfway point crossing the Atlantic, we had steak, pepper sauce and chips to celebrate. We sat at the cockpit table and I even had a glass of wine. If we didn't have photographic evidence to prove it, this memory would be filed with all those others that have been embellished by the passage of time, like those endless sunny days that made up a childhood summer. It just sounds so implausible; at the moment I'm struggling just to stay on my seat at the chart table. We did try and celebrate. Yesterday morning Vanessa made pancakes, which were delicious and thankfully the maple syrup helped them stick to the plate just long enough for them to make the journey from the galley to the cockpit and into our tummies. As an aside, whenever I. read more...


10/03/2018

Mischief - A little bit of Mischief Log 3

Day 9 Thursday 8 March 2018. Radio check; disappointing noon day run; Trevor has delusionsAs it happened there were a couple of showers during the night but nothing too great. The sea state had settled a little too, but it does seem to build at times for no apparent reason. We remain under main and genoa headed 260 degs. The sun arose around 0715 and we enjoyed sparkling early morning sailing in 18 knots of wind from the ESE still.1145 we had an unusual alarm on VHF which was a fuel transporter ship the Bansui, for the purposes of a radio check. The alarm was a DSC individual call alarm on channel 06 which auto sets the VHF to that channel, ship to ship. He obviously had picked up our AIS data which includes our MMSI number that allows him to call us direct. It's the first time I've. read more...


10/03/2018

Lexington - Captain Bob: 7*. 13' north. 52*. 23' west 600 miles from Grenada

We are doing well, very pleased with consistent good winds. I have the 03:00 to 06:00 watch. The winds have been 18-24 knots, mostly around 20. The seas are 6-10 feet. With consistent winds you get more seas. It is hard for a non boater to imagine the movement of the boat and the boaters. Yesterday I was fixing my breakfast of two poached eggs and a slice of banana bread. This meant I had to crack two eggs, place them in a microwave dish for cooking the eggs, hold the device from heeling the eggs out, add water and place them in the microwave. This is all done while I am squatting down to brace my knees against the refrigerator box and my butt against the engine compartment counter space. Any thing on the counter can fly across the boat at any time. Yesterday Karen had fixed a whole bowl. read more...


09/03/2018

Lexington - Captain Bob: 5*. 49' north. 59* 54' west. 800 miles from Granada

We are doing well. We have been in very consistent winds of 16-22 knots from the east for a few days. We are averaging about 175 miles a day. This post is to point out how you need to be on top of things and always be aware of the functions of the boat. Our energy and refrigeration worked great crossing from Africa to Brazil. In Brazil we began to notice that we were having to run our generator much more often. Refrigeration takes the majority of our energy. The water was warmer. The refrigerator was running more often. I actually looked at it every hour for 8 hours, it was always on. The freezer would be off (not running) occasionally. We think we have a slow leak in our refrigerator compressor gas. We ended up turning the freezer temp down and opening the small connection to the. read more...


09/03/2018

Mischief - A little bit of Mischief Log 2 Through the eyes and ears of Chas Baynes Chief cook and bottle washer (Grade 2)

Day 5: Sunday 4 March 2018.Famine and feast;fish for lunch and tea; interesting facts."Hope lives eternal in a fisherman's heart", was the phrase that came to mind as Trevor deployed his fishing lines at first light and in no time a duck became interested, more so than a fish. At least the rain has stopped, albeit still cloudy. There is literally nothing about, not even on AIS. Dave put the generator on at 0600 as the batteries were low but it makes the Watt & Sea generator vibrate which sounds like a demented cow so at 0700 we turned it off as Dave had gone below. 1000: No sooner had Trevor taken some chicken out of the freezer to defrost for tea when we noticed a small Skip Jack on one of the closer lines. It was too small to eat so we threw it back albeit Trevor was eager to keep. read more...


09/03/2018

Shepherd Moon - Repeat after me

We are in the middle of nowhere. I've just checked the chart and we're now closer to Easter Island than the Galapagos, although to get there we'd have to do a sharp left turn. I've always wanted to go to Easter Island, but the World Cruising Routes book (aka "Destroyer of Dreams") says that the wind and the current are in the wrong direction and there's nowhere to stop when you get there. Sounds to me like they're sitting on the fence on that one.We haven't seen another boat in days, although we can see one of the fleet on our AIS (Automatic Information System) and so we know there's someone there over the horizon. Our link with the other boats is via our SSB (Single Side Band) radio, which, dependant on atmospheric conditions, has a range of over a thousand miles. However the reception. read more...


08/03/2018

Lexington - Captain Bob: 03*. 32' north. 046*. 20' west

So I just finished a book, SPINELESS , THE SCIENCE OF JELLYFISH AND THE ART OF GROWING A BACKBONE. It is a book on marine biology and climate change. It really points out how much we do not know about the oceans of the world and our effect on them. My impression is that marine biology is similar to this trip. We have zipped around the world, over the oceans, thru vastly different cultures with very little understanding of our surroundings or of our impact on our environment. I will always remember Tanna and the people there. I spoke to a person who had been there three years earlier for a traditional dance celebration that we saw on our visit. Three years ago the people were dressed in traditional grass clothing. The men had a leaf wrapped around their penis and that was all. This year. read more...


07/03/2018

Mischief - A little bit of Mischief: Log 1 The adventures of Mischief through the eyes and ears Chas Baynes, Chief cook and bottle washer.

Arrival GalapagosArrived San Cristobal airport early afternoon on Sunday 26th February 2018 after a fairly uneventful trip out from Heathrow via Miami and Guayaquil, Ecuador despite the fact that I had contracted the worst man-flu ever experienced by man nor beast just before I left home and have now probably infected half of Florida and South America. I was so dosed up on various cough and cold medicines I was seeing double! A short hop over to San Cristobal was followed by a two minute taxi ride to the port before jumping on a fast "ferry", a past its sale-by-date launch with three 200 cc Mercury outboards designed to shake the living daylights out of you. Two hours later we arrived in Academy Bay Puerto Ayora, Santa Cruz where I met Dave and Trevor from Mischief on the landing stage. read more...


06/03/2018

Shepherd Moon - Life on the edge

We have just passed the 1,000-mile mark and so we are roughly a third of the way to Hiva Oa. That, and the fact the sun has come out after a couple of miserable, overcast days, has lifted the mood on Shepherd Moon. The seas have also calmed down a bit. It is still a challenge walking across the cabin, but you're not being flung around quite so violently. The sea has also become a very attractive blue, so it no longer looks like the English Channel on a drizzly day. No exciting wildlife sightings to report, unfortunately, although each morning we have to clear the decks of flying fish and squid that have arrived in the night, the aquatic equivalent of road-kill. I never realised that squid could fly too, but in the Galapagos we saw them being chased by Sea Lions. They'd shoot out of the. read more...


06/03/2018

Blue Pearl - Big Orange

Well, it happened on day 3 out of the Galapagos. Our new all orange A2 asymmetrical sail went up for the very first timeand she was a sight to behold. More importantly, she moved to boat at a nice 6-8kts in very little wind.The very first day after leaving Puerto Ayora was an absolutely perfect sailing day. We moved at about 8 knots through calm waters with a modest wind blowing and a nice current helping us along. We figured we can handle this 2950 mile crossing easily. Of course reality soon set in and we spent the next 36 hours slogging through squalls, windy squalls, rainy squalls, no wind squalls, they all visited us and we didn't see the sun once. And were the seas confused, waves from every direction, frequency and height. A combination that doesn't make for relaxed sailing.So, we. read more...


06/03/2018

Lexington - Captain Bob: 01*. 11' north. 42*. 47' west

Bill Jones ask a few interesting questions that I thought I would answer in the form of a post. His first question was will I have a yearning to go back to sea. You never know what the future will bring. With my family not into sailing at all, I doubt I will make another run at it. I have attempted a fairly major trip and I doubt I want to try to top it. Definitely I would go crazy going solo. A major benefit of the Arc is the other people you are sailing with. I also do not like fixing the boat. We have been lucky that we have not had too much trouble. I still remember diving over the boat to find a fish plugging the intake of the generator cooling water. In retrospect it was an easy conclusion that I missed earlier in my checklist. Then in diving overboard, my zip lock bag of money and. read more...


06/03/2018

Lexington - Captain Bob: 00* 37' north. 042*. 09' west

We are now in the northern hemisphere. It is 02:40 at the end of my watch. I have been zipping thru the night with 18 knot wind and 4-6 foot seas. It has been a nice ride. I have tried to figure out what I have learned on this trip. Electronics and social media is a good topic to study. I have an iPad that I got for this trip I use it every day. I do my email using our satellite and I read books. I have mixed emotions about iPads and cell phones. There has been many of an occasion that I have looked at a table of people all looking at their phones. At that point I want to say we should all treat ourselves like kids and limit our time on devices. The main problem is on this trip is that internet connections and speed are at a premium. Often when we are together at a restaurant or marina. read more...


05/03/2018

Lexington - Captain Bob: 00*. 01.431 south. 41*. 12' west

So we are waiting around in the cockpit waiting to celebrate crossing the equator for a second time. The first time was right before Galapagos. Now we are headed to Granada. We have a bottle of champagne cold and ready to go. It has been a long haul with a lot of open ocean around us with nothing seen but water and waves. At any one time, we see about 50 square miles of ocean. This is my rough calculation. The point I am trying to make is that there is a lot of water out here. You do not want to go overboard. To do a circumnavigation, you have to cross your path on return. There are lots of variations. Joshua Slocum was the first to record a solo circumnavigation. His boat was called THE SPRAY. If you are interested he wrote a good book about his adventure. He did it with much greater. read more...


05/03/2018

Lexington - Captain Bob: 1*. 18' south. 38*. 41' west

We are on our last long leg of the the whole World Arc. We are just south of the equator and planning a small celebration tomorrow when we cross a second time. I tend to just put my mind into neutral and take it a day at a time. It seems like only yesterday we took off and it seems like I have been away from home forever. I have been making list of things I need to do when I get back. There is nothing all that important but it is spring at home and a lot of things have been neglected. I will probably do the usual, focus on the urgent and neglect the important. I will have the added adjustment of ending the trip and ending my occupation as a physician. I gave my practice away to do this trip but I probably have not truly adjusted to retirement. As a matter of fact, going back to work. read more...


04/03/2018

Shepherd Moon - Curb crawling

There are many things that are frustrating about being trapped on a 48-foot boat for three weeks. You can't go for a walk, for instance, and even the view outside doesn't change that much. On the plus side, you are never more than a few quick steps away from the loo, which is a big plus when you have been suffering from an upset tummy since leaving the Galapagos. Jacob fell victim to the bug the day before we left, and being such a kind, considerate young man, he thought it would be only fair to share it with his father. Thankfully, Vanessa, who has the constitution of an ox, has not succumbed so far. Anyway, feeling sorry for myself is the main reason for a couple of blog-less days, that and the general absence of anything interesting to write about.We are making excellent progress. read more...


04/03/2018

Air Power - Mar 3

Crossing 3000 miles of ocean is measured in weeks, not days like you are driving across the U.S. When we first started out from the Galapagos Islands, there was no wind, and we considered we might have to measure in months. The currents would have gotten us there eventually, sans alcohol, but plenty of canned beans. You would think a journey of this duration would bring on fits of boredom. Are you bored of taking naps? A well hydrated body produces approximately 30 cc (1 oz) of urine an hour. Imagine that 1 oz sloshing around in your bladder while trying to take a nap. It feels more like a quart. You get the picture, even naps are not sacred.When a new recruit first joins the US military, the first thing they learn, is to shine their boots. This keeps them busy before lights out in the. read more...


03/03/2018

Blue Pearl - Experiencing the Pacific

About 200nm's out of Santa Cruz our Yanmar engine is humming away and our boat is rolling around in the swells of the Pacific ocean. We are moving at about 8.3 knots with the help of a steady current pushing us along. Our mainsail is up to steady the roll and help a little bit to move the boat forward. There is very little wind. We are heading for latitude 5 South where the Pacific trade winds should kick in and allow us the sail to the Marquesas and give the Yanmar a rest.Yesterday, our first day out here, we experienced a perfect day of sailing. Nice wind, quiet seas, beautiful skies and that same current helping us along. We covered about 175 nautical miles in that first 24 hours which is pretty good going. At that average speed we will reach our destination in 17days, wishful. read more...


03/03/2018

Libeccio - Galapagos- Isabela

Greetings from the crew of Libeccio, Once again we must send our apologies for being tardy on our updates. We get busy and before you know it you are almost 3 days into a passage to the Marquesas and you realise that you missed commenting on two of the Galapagos islands. I am sure you can relate. This is going to be a bit long, so either hit "like" now and move on or grab a coffee! I think we last mentioned we had just arrived at Isla Isabella, following a dramatic and very brave action by the good ship Libeccio to transfer emergency fuel to our friends Denis and Briggitte on Pret Aixte. No movie offers have yet been received but it must be due to our agent negotiating the best deal and not due to the fact that it wasn't that brave nor dangerous. We have been looking forward to Isabela. read more...


03/03/2018

Mischief - Heading for Hiva Oa

We have set off again on the longest leg of the trip, 3000 to Hiva Oa in the French Marquasas. We had agreat time in Galapagos visiting San Cristobal, Isabella and Santa Cruz. Wendy and I have visited before but that doesn't reduce the awe and wonder we experienced. Swimming with sharks, turtles, manta rays and dolphins can never get boring.We said goodbye to Dave and Lisa and hello to Charlie Baynes. We are now 4 for the long passage with Trevor and Charlie on one watch and Wendy and I on the other.The first 2 days at sea have gone well with over 300 miles covered across the tropical convergence zone or doldrums as I know them. Everyone is settling into the watch system and we are back to eating like kings and queens again. There was meant to be very little wind and we expecting to. read more...


02/03/2018

Shepherd Moon - Things that go bump in the night

At midday yesterday we left the Santa Cruz in the Galapagos Islands to head for Hiva Oa in French Polynesia. It's 2,950 nautical miles as the crow flies, assuming the said crow understands about great circles. However the Galapagos Islands sit in the middle of the doldrums, and so to find wind, we need to head south before turning right. We will therefore need to sail for more than 3,000 miles before we see land again, compared to 2,100 miles for our Atlantic crossing; a mere hop, skip and a jump by comparison. On the plus side, the winds should be stronger and more consistent, and so we expect to make landfall on the 20th March, assuming all goes to plan.Our time in the Galapagos felt very different from our previous visit. When we came in 2008 we spent a week on board a tall ship,. read more...


27/02/2018

Lexington - Captain Bob: Olinda Tour

We set up a tour for about 20 of us to go to Olinda. Olinda is an old city near the larger city of Recife. As it turned out it was the worst tour we have had the whole trip. It really was not much of a tour versus a taxi ride to a nice tourist city. They did not provide much information and they were not organized in what they planned to show us. At lunch I had the Lonely Planet on my iPad and pointed out two museums that were close by. They welcomed that information like it was news to them. To top it off we had bad traffic on the way back that added about 1-11/2 hours to the day. Now I will stop belly aching and show some photos image1 image2 image3 image4 image5 image6 image7 image8 image9 image10. read more...


Lexington - Captain Bob: Olinda Tour
Lexington - Captain Bob: Olinda Tour
Lexington - Captain Bob: Olinda Tour
Lexington - Captain Bob: Olinda Tour
Lexington - Captain Bob: Olinda Tour
Lexington - Captain Bob: Olinda Tour
Lexington - Captain Bob: Olinda Tour
Lexington - Captain Bob: Olinda Tour
Lexington - Captain Bob: Olinda Tour
Lexington - Captain Bob: Olinda Tour
Lexington - Captain Bob: Olinda Tour
Lexington - Captain Bob: Olinda Tour
Lexington - Captain Bob: Olinda Tour
Lexington - Captain Bob: Olinda Tour
Lexington - Captain Bob: Olinda Tour
Lexington - Captain Bob: Olinda Tour
Lexington - Captain Bob: Olinda Tour
Lexington - Captain Bob: Olinda Tour
Lexington - Captain Bob: Olinda Tour
Lexington - Captain Bob: Olinda Tour
26/02/2018

Air Power - Feb 25

Strange noises are something you always be alert for, especially at sea. Fire crackers normally don't draw an eye raise on 4th of July, New Years etc. Heck, even guns fired in the air in the rural sections of the South. In the Middle East, they are usually encouraged during weddings and other festivities.A gennaker sail can make loud cracking noises whenever the wind gets in front of sail, it starts to collapse, then re-inflates. (Crack!!! like lightening) During the daytime you can see it. You don't like it, but it happens. We knew we had a line chaffing leading from the "guy" to the tack on the bottom corner of the sail. We figured, when it let loose, we would take the sail in and replace it with a spare one. (We have several pre-made). So, it was not a matter of if, but when was this. read more...


Blue Pearl - Sunrise-Santa Cruz, Galapagos.
Blue Pearl - Sunrise-Santa Cruz, Galapagos.
24/02/2018

Lexington - Captain Bob: day trip

We have rented a car and did some exploring. We went to a place in the middle of a river where there were rock carvings that I think they have dated about 5,000 years old. They were not painted on the rock like we have seen before. These were carved into the rock which was similar to granite. There were two people there who acted as guides. The we archeological students studying the carvings. image1 image2 image3 image4 image5 image6 image7 image8. read more...


Lexington - Captain Bob: day trip
Lexington - Captain Bob: day trip
Lexington - Captain Bob: day trip
Lexington - Captain Bob: day trip
Lexington - Captain Bob: day trip
Lexington - Captain Bob: day trip
Lexington - Captain Bob: day trip
Lexington - Captain Bob: day trip
Lexington - Captain Bob: day trip
Lexington - Captain Bob: day trip
Lexington - Captain Bob: day trip
Lexington - Captain Bob: day trip
Lexington - Captain Bob: day trip
Lexington - Captain Bob: day trip
Lexington - Captain Bob: day trip
Lexington - Captain Bob: day trip
22/02/2018

Air Power - Feb 22

After approximately 100 hours of motoring, we are finally sailing and pointing toward the Marquesas Islands. The GRIB files did not look promising, until we passed through 5 degrees Southlatitude and west of the 94 degree line West longitude. There is one thing to be said for motoring in glassy seas, the boat rides flat and stable. It was like being on a lake for the first 4 days. Now we get the up and down, back and forth motion that 13 knots of wind provide. Waves generally run 45 degrees off the wind line. So, they push you along at a bit of an angle.The moon also returned and is actually up at night, as opposed to during the day. What a novelty. Lately we have to rely on the radar to avoid colliding with any unknown obstacle. If the radar ever picks up a sleeping whale, we'll be sure. read more...


22/02/2018

Lexington - Captain Bob: Capadello

We are in a marina near Capadello. It is a very quiet marina on a river to Capadello. The city was Joao Pessoa. There was a small area of small shops and one restaurant. Their attraction for tourist is a saxophone player who is paddled along in the water beside the shops. He has been doing his act for many years every day at sunset. It was amazing the amount of traffic he seemed to generate. It was a Keywest Sunset type event on a smaller scale. We had dinner at a restaurant that was built as a tree house. image1 image2 image3. read more...


Lexington - Captain Bob: Capadello
Lexington - Captain Bob: Capadello

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