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20/05/2018

Ngahue IV - I'm a poor lonesome cowboy...

Fans of Lucky Luke, a Belgian comic strip character created by Morris, will recognise this as the song with which this cowboy, who shoots faster than his shadow, ends each story album. Well, Nieuwpoort, Belgium, where we normally keep the boat, is indeed 2766M away - still. And that's in a direct line! And at the moment we're pretty lonesome out here in the Atlantic, with only zillions of plankton on or near the sea surface, which light up under our waxing moon (what little was visible of it through the clouds), to accompany us. AIS: empty... Radar at maximum range: empty... Visual inspection up to our horizon: empty... And a star-blazing sky? Mostly obscured by the clouds. Sitting in the cockpit of the boat, seeing time ticking by, courtesy of our highly accurate GPS system, you can. read more...


19/05/2018

Ngahue IV - Jumping dolphins don't need no wind!

As yet another calm day drew to a close, Ngahue IV was suddenly the target of a school of dolphins. We saw them approaching the boat from afar, and the dolphins were keen that we noticed them arriving, as they jumped several feet out of the water before riding our bow wave and swimming around the boat. We're currently in 1 to 2 knot winds, so our Volvo-Penta is humming away at 1250 revs to give us a speed over ground of some 5 knots. Perhaps it was this engine noise that made the dolphins push on after only a few minutes around the boat. Well, it certainly made a nicer spectacle than the continuous parade of Portuguese Men-of-War that we see passing each day.And so our trip continues to the next waypoint on the plotter, which I've hopefully named "Windpoint Sunday" where we should start. read more...


19/05/2018

Mazu - Day 4 and We Are Drifting ....

We finally resorted to seeking help from the engine about 10pm last night as our speed over ground had dropped to around 3.5 knots.We motored slowly overnight, heading in a northerly direction, but sadly it seems we are in a patch of very light airs that will likely persist throughout the day today.After about 13 hours of the noise, we tired of the noise and resorted to drifting ..... but at least we are drifting in the right direction and we seem to be getting a little help from some current.Chris Parker’s forecast, which is backed up by various other sources of weather, suggests that we don’t want to go much further north as there is a cold front north of us (a line of dark clouds north of us supports this prediction).So, we plan to stay close to our current latitude of about 36. read more...


19/05/2018

Selkie - Update on Kids

Tristan (11) games a lot and loves his movie time. He can get cranky, but then he has beautiful moments where he does all the dishes with a smile, organizes really well, or plans a moment with a little. The other day on his afternoon watch, he made a pulley system that ran the length of the boat with our Polar Express book as a platter. It’s so no one has to get out of bed, he said. Lily (9) is such a sweetheart. Endless amounts of questions and a willingness to help with the littles or in the galley. She’s been going to the cockpit to stare off into the distance and write poetry. Yesterday she used her goddess cards to add more detail. We know she’s been writing when we find her crumpled pieces of paper all over the deck. On day one, she drew a picture of Tristan and put her Baba’s # on. read more...


19/05/2018

Selkie - 265 NM

Nothing. Calm. No wind. No waves. No swells. A lapping in the ocean like folding. How can something so big be so still, so quiet? The most gentle of breezes can be felt and barely harnessed. Main out with preventer in place, but Selkie bangs and fights and is curious to her surroundings like a caged animal. I’m scared to ask for wind. I don’t want it three fold. There is nothing above the surface. I wonder about the depths. What’s eating what in an endless aquatic food chain? The ocean is darkness. As the sliver of the moon set at sunset, we could see the dark side so clearly it made us laugh and stare in wonderment. This is a life outdoors. Who else can say they see every sunset and sunrise of every day? Who else cares so much about weather and wind? Who else moves with the will of the. read more...


19/05/2018

Selkie - Update on our Food

Savory Selkie. So far we’ve devoured endless amounts of fresh fruit like apples, bananas, plums, tangerines, pears, and more apples. The kids have learned to covet fruit more than dessert. They share little tangerines like mini meals. At this point, apples, plums, and grapefruit remain. We bought so many vegetables, we couldn’t keep up. We splurged on multiple meals of cucumbers and peppers with hummus, an abundance of green beans, greens, broccoli, zucchini, carrots, cabbage, asparagus, tomatoes, and celery. Some remain, but the broccoli molded and had to be given to Poseidon. So far we’ve dined on an Hawaiian Pork BBQ with roasted asparagus, a taco casserole with green beans, and a beef stew with dumplings. The fresh food dwindles quickly. Nick asks, Are we gonna run out of food? No, I. read more...


19/05/2018

Jubilate Mare - Where’s the wind?

Well, after our initial euphoria with the extra speed gained by putting up the cruising chute, the wind slowly died on us and we were struggling to get 3 knots. Every possible sail combination was tried - but to no avail. So they were all put away and we turned the engine on and headed north to chase the wind for the next 24 hours. We heard we were not alone in making this decision over the radio, so that was reassuring.Chef of the day was Kieron and he whizzed up some seriously garlicky humus that we had with our evening tipple. No one was going to be bothered by vampires for the rest of the night. Salmon pasta and fruit cocktail followed and all plates were licked clean - it saves on water not having to wash up! We will see what delights tomorrow has in store.. read more...


19/05/2018

Ngahue IV - After every night comes day

Another night at sea with no other company than the stars, a few clouds and, very briefly, a waxing moon. Not a ship in sight and nothing on the AIS. Pure silence on VHF channels 16 and 72, now our ARC listening channel... No flying fish on deck; and as Portuguese Men-of-War aren't visible in the dark, none of them either (though there are plenty around this morning). No wind, either, so the only disturbance really was the soft droning of our Volvo-Penta TAMD 41B...We were both on watch to see a beautiful sunrise announce the coming of a new day - La Vie est Belle... or to translate this French film title, Life is Beautiful!All we need to do now is cross an area of approximately 130M to start getting some better wind, which undoubtedly the rest of the fleet has picked up ages ago.. read more...


19/05/2018

Blonde Moment - Bermuda to Azores 1

wednesdy 16th may Bermuda has been a great stopover. Apart from the first couple ofdays when we arrived the weather has been fantastic ,almost wall to wall sunshine and a light cooling breeze. Touring the island by scooter is a mustfor any visitor and great fun can be had .We were hosted by st Georges dinghy and sports club and whilst I think all would agree that a referb. is required to the club house nobody could argue that the view from the balcony is fantastic - a great place for a Dark and Stormy sun downer.Well all good things must come to an end and so it was time to leave Bermudaand head off to the Azores.The weather on start day was no different to the previous few days with glorious sunshine and light winds. Normally i am not one that gets mixed up in the boat mess on the start. read more...


19/05/2018

Mischief - Up to Mischief Log 38 Further adventures of S/Y Mischief through the eyes and ears of Chas Baynes

Wednesday, 16th May 2018 - en route to SuwarrowThe wind eased as the night progressed, dropped to below 10 knots and came around onto the beam so we had to drop the genoa off the spinnaker pole. But come daylight, just as my watch ended at 0600, Dave rigged the spinnaker to hoist so no sleep for me with him clambering all over the deck and calling instructions aft, so I gave up and went back on deck to set the sail and we are now back to 8 knots boat speed in 15 knots of wind on a course of 290 degrees. There was a medical emergency overnight on one of our fellow ARC fleet boats, Lunatix the fastest boat in the fleet. Apparently a crew member had got in the way of the mainsheet on an accidental gybe and the gybe preventer failed: head injuries and lacerations resulted, and he is lucky to. read more...


18/05/2018

Ngahue IV - One empty sea - one beautiful sunset

As we move into our 3rd night at sea, we really are at the back of the fleet. This morning we could see the top of Selkie's mast. But since this afternoon our horizon has been completely empty. Not a ship in sight! We can pick up 2 other Class B AIS vessels some 35 Miles away. That's way over our horizon though!! We can see lots of Portuguese Men-of-War floating by, and this evening there even was a lost seabird circling around the boat. Heavens only knows where the flying fish are, as during the daytime you hardly see one. Usually just one, and not as on our East-West Atlantic crossing in whole schools.The sun is setting very beautifully and it is giving the sea an extra dimension of dark blue. So a perfect setting for another wonderful night.Only down side: the wind has given up on us. read more...


18/05/2018

Mazu - Day 3 and Still Sailing Gently

I shouldn’t have written so confidently that we had passed Gloria of Southampton.... Shortly after I had sent the last blog, her captain, Tim, greeted us on VHF and informed us that his crew had been whipped into shape and they would be pulling out all the stops to regain the ground they had lost to us.So, the battle began.... and they gradually gained on us, indeed they came so close, we caught them on one of our fishing lines!Having cut them free, they proceeded to overtake us ... with plenty of opportunity for mutual admiration and photos/videos (I’m looking forward to seeing us in action ... maybe we’ll learn how we can improve).Good fun, but the battle wasn’t over yet.Eventually, they managed to hold their “kite” on a more downwind heading than we could and thus gain some northing. read more...


Cayuse - anchored in Suwarrow
Cayuse - anchored in Suwarrow
18/05/2018

Jubilate Mare - Second day highlights

We had a super day’s sailing. With the wind dropping off we chose to fly the cruising chute. A great decision - we’ve added good speed and it makes the Atlantic a more colourful place. Winds looking good for the next 36 hours so it’s safe overnight. Weather was perfect, warm with a pleasant breeze and we had dolphins playing around the boat. Caribbean humidity has disappeared.Dozens of Portuguese Man of War jelly fish were also sighted. They appear as very clear glass bubbles about the size of a football floating on surface. Thanks to several other boats for telling us what they were! Did you know that their tentacles can be as long as 12 metres - doesn’t really bear thinking about, does it?!Our trusty captain cooked clam chowder for the crew supper; enjoyed by all in the cockpit whilst. read more...


18/05/2018

Firefly - ARC Eurovision Song Contest

  All is well aboard Firefly after almost 2 days of blissful sailing. Theexpected light winds have been just enough to make good progress towards theAzores using our Assymetric Spinnaker. Achieving the desired course and headingnorth east we have managed to log 330 miles sailed in the first 48 hours.However, the wind has now veered and it is a difficult decision whether to ybeand head north or whether to just carry on east.....heading north east is nolonger possible at a reasonable speed. We have elected to gybe but will downloadthe latest weather gribs soon in order to work out our strategy and make surethat heading north is the best call.   Mike, our new crew member has settled in very well and life aboard with 3people means 50% less watches and much more sleep ......in fact. read more...


18/05/2018

Ngahue IV - Our first flying fish!

Usually on an ocean passage, the first job of the day on deck is to clear the flying fish that have inadvertently landed on board during the previous night. Sailing out of Bermuda, we didn't spot any flying fish in the water, and after our first night at sea discovered a deck completely bereft of the little critters (coming into Bermuda we had 4 really tiny flying fish on deck - you wonder how they managed to fly that high to land on us, as we have a pretty high free board, especially forward of the mast).Innocently we thought that flying fish had been replaced by Portuguese Men-of-War 5which don't leap out of the water and end up on your deck); so we thought no more of it.Last night, however, Laura had heard some suspicious flapping on deck, but during my normal morning deck and rigging. read more...


18/05/2018

Blue Pearl - Back in Tahiti

Our cruising life is full of surprises. Last time I reported on our wonderful time in the Society Islands and our upcoming visit to Bora Bora, the last island of this island group included in our itinerary. And now, unexpectedly, Blue Pearl is back at the dock in Tahiti awaiting arrival of a replacement part for our generator from the US.Our generator had started to malfunction and the nearest place for repairs to be made was Tahiti, so here we are. The sail back from Bora Bora to Tahiti was interesting. It was a nice windy night so we happily sailed along, we didn't have the generator to charge our batteries when the time came but we did have the boat engine which could do the same thing.. Or so we thought..! When the time came to charge and we turned the engine on the alternator (the. read more...


17/05/2018

Ngahue IV - Furukado continues

There's a song in The Mikado (a Gilbert and Sullivan opera - very popular with amateur opera groups in the UK) called "A wand'ring Minstrel I". Our autopilot's erratic behaviour reminds me of this song, and if you mix up Furuno and Mikado, you get Furukado (or Mikaruno - pick your choice). Either way it's particularly bothersome to see our track meandering all over the plotter!!! We've switched to wind mode on the autopilot as the meandering there is limited to some 15-20° either side of the wind's course; in course to destination mode, the meandering can be as much as 20-30° either side of the desired course! A mess...Like the other boats in the fleet, we've had our fair share of Portuguese men-of-war passing by the boat. When we saw the first one, we thought its sail was a discarded. read more...


17/05/2018

Makara - Day 2 - It Was Going So Well

Compared to the strong winds on the nose for days and huge waves we had crossing from Florida to Bermuda, the delightfully light winds and surprisingly flat Atlantic seas during the first 24 hours on route to The Azores seemed more than we could have wished for. Flying our huge spinnaker (sized for a 47-foot catamaran) we were cruising along, enjoying being up with the front runners of the fleet... until I noticed that a thin line seemed to have become caught in the block at the end of the bowsprit. Fearing that it might hinder the tack line, I popped up to the bow, with cursory “I’ll be right back.”The bowsprit had disconnected from the bow of the boat, but luckily had become wedged in the barrel of the jib roller furler... 20 minutes later we had the spinnaker dowsed, jib hoisted,. read more...


Makara - Day 2 - It Was Going So Well
Makara - Day 2 - It Was Going So Well
Makara - Day 2 - It Was Going So Well
Makara - Day 2 - It Was Going So Well
Makara - Day 2 - It Was Going So Well
Makara - Day 2 - It Was Going So Well
Makara - Day 2 - It Was Going So Well
Makara - Day 2 - It Was Going So Well
17/05/2018

Selkie - Night 1: Leg 2 Bermuda to Azores

The Milky Way. Stars beyond stars beyond stars. Meteors grant me wishes of a safe passage. It’s so quiet. Ngahue seems to be our partner in crime: same heading, same speed, both of us lagging behind with no spinnakers. There is so much space in this darkness, yet I feel like I could reach out and hold their hand, a fellow astronaut in space. Sagittarius to my right makes me laugh with its big teapot shape. Would you like a cup a tea Ngahue? The Big Dipper is prominent to my left taking up the sky replacing the moon, and it is so dark that I can see every star in the Little Dipper and Draco. It is refreshing, soul replenishing, comforting. If I wasn’t strapped in, I think I’d float away like a parasail. I can see four boat lights. I’m curious about the distant two. Funny to have so much. read more...


17/05/2018

Mazu - Great First Day out from Bermuda!

Although a little stressful to start, our first day back at sea turned out to be a real pleasure, one that seemed to make up for the trials of the passage to Bermuda. Unfortunately we missed the 11:00 am start with the rest of the Class A Cruiser boats because we were still waiting (not so patiently) for our turn to fill our fuel tanks.We did get a great view of all the other 31 boats starting in near ideal conditions.An hour or so late, we raised the mainsail and motor-sailed through the St Georges cut, passing close to an incoming ferry, which probably gave him more cause for concern than it did us.Once out, with genoa filling, engine off, we cleared the reefs and decided conditions were ideal for flying the asymmetric spinnaker, flattish seas, wind about 10 knots just aft of abeam So,. read more...


17/05/2018

Ngahue IV - Ngahue IV - It's a looooong way, to Tippe-Horta

Our first night at sea again! It came and went - all very quietly. We started off the night with a thin sickle of the waxing moon in a very clear sky. The wind is a gentle south-south-easterly varying from 8 to 11 knots. At eight knots of wind we see the whole ARC fleet move ahead of us. But at eleven knots we generally keep up, and even manage to sail faster than Selkie, our main rival for last place at the moment ;-). Now, as the morning sun rises over the horizon, Selkie has moved a little behind us, but together we are the rearguard of the ARC Europe fleet. The van is far ahead and off our AIS screen... Another surprise: the relative "dryness" of the night. During our last night sailing to Bermuda, the deck and cockpit was completely wet with moisture from the damp air. Not so this. read more...


17/05/2018

Libeccio - Suwarrow- first group ashore

The first World ARC group to reach Suwarrow held a combined sundowner and litter pick-up event this evening. All boats participated. The group first went across to the windward side using a trail that lead between the buildings that remain on the island all the way out to the windward shore line. The group split into two and went different directions around the island. In doing so, the island was circumnavigated by the two groups and all litter was collected along the way.Following the collection, everyone gathered on the beach by the dock to enjoy their sundowners and each other company.A very pleasant evening was had by all,Kevin and JaneS/V Libeccio. read more...


16/05/2018

Ngahue IV - Leading the fleet from behind

So we're back at sea again! Skipper briefing yesterday with Mark and Lyall - and today Mark successfully shepherded all 28 departing boats across the start line in Saint George's Harbour, complete with Diag. 2-1a. Predictably, the lighter and faster boats shot off like bats out of hell, with the heavier and slower boats slowly moving to the back of the ARC fleet. Ngahue IV definitely fits into the latter category. Nevertheless, we manage to happily trundle along at about 5 1/2 knots (even touching - oh so briefly - 7.1 knots when the wind got up a bit on a northeasterly course in search of stronger winds. Our Furuno autopilot continues to meander 30° off course to port and to starboard. So it's probably just as well that there is no one behind us anymore, as we zig-zag our way to the. read more...


16/05/2018

Mischief - Up to Mischief Log 37 Further adventures of S/Y Mischief through the eyes and ears of Chas Baynes

Monday, 14th May 2018 - Off Bora Bora Yacht ClubWe had to do a generator service this morning early so was outside at 7am pumping away at an oil pump which was a real heart starter I can tell you.Today is preparations day for the re-start tomorrow so ashore at 9.30am for the Skippers briefing then along to the Gendarmerie with passports to check out of French Polynesia then into the supermarket where two trolley loads cost £600! Unfortunately, they had no tortilla wraps which we use a lot and neither did they have any eggs, would you believe which is a bit ironic given the number of chickens there are running amok around the island. The Super U market didn't have any either but they did say that more were to be delivered one hour after we leave for Suwarrow. But the shop did have a. read more...


15/05/2018

Firefly - Leaving Bermuda

We are provisioned and checked out so are ready for the next leg leaving at 11:10 local time tomorrow.Mike Sandover has now joined us so a bit more sleep for Paul and Peter this time.It’s been a great stop over here many thanks to the ARC Europe team and the St George’s Dinghy and Sports Club ;they could not have done more to make us welcome and at home. Bermuda is a fantastic and friendly place and hope to be back sometime.Next stop the Azores!Paul, Mike and Peter. read more...


15/05/2018

Mischief - Up to Mischief Log 36 Further adventures of S/Y Mischief through the eyes and ears of Chas Baynes

Saturday 12th May 2018 - Back to Bora BoraWoke at 0220 as I suddenly had a thought that I hadn't tied the dinghy on properly, then of course you have to get up to check. At last it had stopped raining and the wind had dropped considerably but it had left the dinghy literally half full of water - probably the equivalent of 6 inches of rain in a few hours. We were up again at 0700 and by 0715 we had the anchor up and were heading for the lagoon exit in 10 knots of wind from the NE, a favourable direction for this channel but even so there were quite large waves hitting us when we went through the narrow gap in the surf. The huge breaking surf waves 15m either side of us only go to demonstrate why this exit is impassable in a wind over tide situation. Even today one incoming wave put us. read more...


15/05/2018

Ngahue IV - Departure day -1

Departure day -1. Tomorrow we will leave this beautiful island with her very friendly people. Never met so many friendly inhabitants in a place...whatever they are or their position, an example for many other places!--Transmitted by Laura Braive using YB Connect (www.ybtracking.com). read more...


14/05/2018

Binkertoo - Limerick

Its 11 o'clock and the ARC Europe begins18 yachts have left the marina to joinUs on Binkertoo With our stalwart crewOf Taff, Peter and Ben, we're off on a run. Great Thatch Island we pass after an hourAnd turn to starboard for a further hourPast Jost van DykeThen another hikeTo head due north for Bermuda. Emerging from the shelter of the landWe meet the full force of the wind25 knots on the beamWith 8 foot high seasBouncing, pitching, rolling, we become subdued. We're flying along at an amazing paceWe swop to the jib on the inner stayMuttley to windwardNgahue to leeward It's hard to believe it's not a race. Whizzing north we're clocking up the miles While wishing we were full of smilesMeals cancelledEating abandonedPatching Taff's finger takes a whiles. Meanwhile clearing the soup from. read more...


13/05/2018

Firefly - SSB Net traffic

While we were net controller for the day on passage from the BVIs we asked the fleet to summarise their day in three words. Here are some of the responses ;Blond Moment ; English Afternoon TeaChat Eau Bleu; Where are the Fish ? (well4 words but who’s counting)Firefly ; Avacado just rightKhaleesi; Nine knot sailing,Spindrift; What’s for dinner?Zealand; Knife through butterDevona; Fishing for weed.and our favourite and winner of the prize;My Lady; Gintonic Ultimate SundownerHopefully more contributions on the next legPaul, Mike (just arrived) and Peter. read more...


Selkie - Bermuda
Selkie - Bermuda
13/05/2018

Selkie - Poem from Leg 1 Crossing to Bermuda from BVI

Poem written night of May 10, our last night, taking it slow to reach Bermuda at sunrise. “Moon Trail on the Water”The sea is quiet tonight, talkingonly with small curves. She calls meto walk the Moon trail promising a safety she cannot keep. Her Cheshiresmile teases me, makes fun of mewith an eerie laugh keeping secrets. Below the surface, they stare at me,the mermen, knowing my vulnerability. A curve of a wave threatens to swallow me, take me against my will, then decidesNo, I’ll save her for later. Clouds saunter inand the ocean goes black. More calls I hear, spirits, waiting and wonderingabout me. The stars, unglamorous tonight, peep through holes judging. Sails bang. The ocean whispers. Phosphorus lights in currents hit the hullsqueaking at. read more...


13/05/2018

Selkie - Leg 1: BVI to Bermuda

Written Monday May 7, 2018. Two days in. In the Middle of Nowhere is Everything. Who am I? As a mom and individual with my own desires I ask myself this question all the time. Today, seasickness left the crew and we had what could be called a normal/eye-opening experience. The waves come in huge swells that you are sure to consume you but don’t. Boats! Are incredible. To sail on natural wind across an expanse of such magnitude is mind boggling. Our ARC friends from VA, I’ve heard, are having a much harder time. If we stick East to the rum line, we think we will miss these storms approaching that they are engulfed in. All the weather reports of small 5 knot winds are very wrong. The ocean, our planet, is a water plant. Blue. Inside us and out. It’s volatile and consuming. It is in. read more...


12/05/2018

Mischief - Up to Mischief Log 35 Further adventures of S/Y Mischief through the eyes and ears of Chas Baynes

Thursday 10th May 2018 - MaupitiWe were up at 0600 to see Jean off, the Pamplemouse Queen. Who will slice up the pamplemouse now of a morning? One thing is for certain, my buttocks are aching this morning after yesterday's exertions!By 0700 we were heading out towards the exit channel and westwards towards Maupiti, the most west of the Society islands and reportedly the prettiest, with its various shades of blue waters and the fact that it is home to a Manta Ray breeding area, and extensive coral gardens. It was still raining, or in-between rain showers and what wind there was was on the nose so we motored the whole 30 miles. The entrance channel to Maupiti is both narrow and shallow but well marked. There were large breaking surf waves on either side as we tentatively made our way. read more...


12/05/2018

Firefly - Arrived in Bermuda

Firefly had a great sail over from the BVIs, it took 5 days and after a ‘little bumpy’ first night we settled into a good beam to broad reach for most of the trip with a little dead down wind under goose wing for the last evening as we approached Bermuda.Sailing with just the two of us got a little tiring at times but we coped and even managed ham omelettes for breakfast on our last morning sail in to St George’s.We were welcomed at the customs dock with a dark and stormy from Mark of WCC so we were soon in non sailing mode.The highlight of our first full day ashore was a trip to Hamilton and watching the World Match Racing Gold Cup at the Royal Bermuda Yacht Club. Great racing and hospitality.Our third crew member Mike arrives tonight as get ourselves and Firefly prepared for departure. read more...


Blue Pearl - Bora Bora in the distance from Blue Pearl.
Blue Pearl - Bora Bora in the distance from Blue Pearl.
Blue Pearl - Blue Pearl at Huahine
Blue Pearl - Blue Pearl at Huahine
11/05/2018

Mischief - Up to Mischief Log 34 Further adventures of S/Y Mischief through the eyes and ears of Chas Baynes

Tuesday 8th May - Bora BoraAfter a wet and windy night, we upped anchor at 0715. The chain was laid across two or three coral bommies and we knew the way the chain snatched when we initially dropped anchor it was caught on something solid, and so it was. But our windlass is strong enough to break the anchor out of the coral heads and as each cracked as it gave way which was a shame, but this is a recognized anchorage spot. Mad Monkey the other day burnt his windlass out in the same location - expensive!As I said, it has been raining most of the night but this morning I was greeted by a bright rainbow over the Coral Gardens, and the wind had abated somewhat, in fact it had all but gone and we sailed off to the lagoon exit 2 miles south before heading off north west again towards Bora. read more...


09/05/2018

Mischief - Up to Mischief Log 33 Further adventures of S/Y Mischief through the eyes and ears of Chas Baynes

Day 68 Sunday 6 May 2018 - Taha'aAfter a quick dip we set off across the lagoon north to Taha'a the second island within the confines of the one barrier reef. We were heading for what we had been reported as the most beautiful bay in the French Polynesia's, Faaroa. We stopped en route as there is a spot identified in 'Charlies Charts' as having excellent snorkeling. We were a good way off the reef and it was fairly choppy, so it was quite a swim across, yet the water was clear and warm despite it being overcast. Unfortunately, when I eventuallyarrived there was little to see, only sand bottom so I turned around and swam back again. As the weather was a bit changeable we thought we would motor into the bay just to see what it was like and if it was worthy of us stopping. However, it was. read more...


08/05/2018

Firefly - Over half way to Bermuda

All is going well on board Firefly. After a brisk and bumpy departure fromthe BVIs we are now settled into a calmer sea, and 15 to 20k of wind from theESE. Its just Paul and Peter on board until Bermuda so more tiring than ournormal 3 man team for passages.We are really looking forward to Mike joining usso we can have more snooze time on the next leg.  Paul and Peter. read more...


06/05/2018

Mischief - Up to Mischief Log 32 Further adventures of S/Y Mischief through the eyes and ears of Chas Baynes

Day 65 Thursday 3rd May 2018 -Baie Faaroe, RaiateaWe dropped the mooring at 0800 and allowed Calisto, another ARC yacht whom had just arrived into the anchorage, to pick up our vacated buoy. We set off on a reciprocal course to our entry - it was still tight in places so had me on the bow on 'bommie watch' for an hour or so (and saw a small shark!), all the way back to Fare where we exited the lagoon and into the open ocean bound for Raiatea some 20 nm away to the west.There was no wind though, so we had to motor half way across before there was sufficient to sail, and then from in front of the beam so couldn't try out the repaired spinnaker that had been our intention. Raiatea does look inviting apart from the rain squalls we could see obscuring some of the peaks. We are heading for the. read more...


07/05/2018

Blue Pearl - Society Islands.

It's been a while since you last heard from Blue Pearl but rest assured, we are having a wonderful time in the Society Islands. I had told you last week that we left Tahiti on Monday and today, a week later, we are in Taha after visiting Huahine and Raiatea. Confusing, I know, but just get your maps out and you can figure out where we are. Our next stop has a more familiar name, Bora Bora, which is the last of the Society Islands that we will visit. It is also the last French Polynesian territory that we will be at.We have admired beautiful scenery, enjoyed wonderful meals and great restaurants, snorkeled in beautiful blue water, swamwith sharks (yes, not dolphins this time) while scuba diving and visited prominent local sites. One, the mecca of the Polynesian religion, on the Island of. read more...


07/05/2018

Ngahue IV - Trundling along nicely

The wind has shifted to the southeast, so we are now on a direct course for Bermuda. Only La Capitana is still in AIS range and there is very little other traffic around. We like our comfort on Ngahue IV so we are still well reefed and only trundling along at some 7 knots. That's more than enough for us though, especially with the sea-state that is still quite boisterous. So far only a single flying fish decided to land on board, though he was a pretty big one. Nothing much else to report: we hope to be in Bermuda for Friday.Fair winds until then!. read more...


06/05/2018

Ngahue IV - on our way to Bermuda

Yesterday, like a stern swimming instructor, Mark pushed us all into the deep end of the swimming pool. And thus 18 boats set off from Nanny Cay marina on the approx. 845 mile trip to Bermuda. Once passed Tortola and on a beam reach headed for Bermuda, the fleet quickly dispersed as the "speed boys" like Devona and Blonde Moment shot off to the north, and the slower boats took a little longer to get settled in. On Ngahue IV we had our bit of Shake, Rattle and Roll throughout the night and day, with windgusts up to approx. 29 knots. Today Sunday the wind has abated as has the seastate. We could do with a little more sunshine, but generally things are fine as we head on further northwards. For the first time since arriving in the Caribbean, we needed to put on an extra garment at nightto. read more...


03/05/2018

Mischief - Up to Mischief Log 31 Further adventures of S/Y Mischief through the eyes and ears of Chas Baynes

Day 63 Tuesday 1st May 2018 - Fare to Baie d'Avea, HuahineWent ashore for bread again around 0730 and took myself off for a jog whilst Dave and Wendy did the shopping; they were planning to have a coffee somewhere, but it transpired that it was a bank holiday here and everywhere was shut, other than the SuperU. There was a hive of activity outside the supermarket as there had been a supply ship arrive overnight which re-stocked the shop so there was a queue of locals waiting to stockpile supplies. We set off for a passage down the island inside the barrier reef to the Baie d'Avea, right on the southern tip. It is fairly well marked but there are a few shallow patches to watch out for and it is a bit of a slalom course. The route took us passed some gorgeous scenery: hills, cliffs and. read more...


IceBear - IMG_3596.JPG
IceBear - IMG_3596.JPG

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