can we help
+44(0)1983 296060
+1 757-788-8872
tell me moreJoin a rally

Daily Logs

Filter by..
Search


Zython - Zython picture
Zython - Zython picture
Silver Slipper - the crew
Silver Slipper - the crew
Silver Slipper - the crew
Silver Slipper - the crew
Silver Slipper - the crew
Silver Slipper - the crew
Silver Slipper - the crew
Silver Slipper - the crew
Silver Slipper - the crew - Ian McLaren-Morris
Silver Slipper - the crew - Ian McLaren-Morris
18/03/2013

Sephina of Beaumaris - ARC 2013 Day Minus 251

Or -35 Weeks or -6024 Hours or -21,686,400 Seconds. This is not the beginning for me. Nearly 3 years ago I bought a boat to do the ARC and beyond so I started a blogg to chart the whole journey at www.sephina.org. However the opening of the 2013 ARC blogg makes things more real and has stated to make very real the preparations. After following the World Cruising site for several years and avidly reading the posts from the Atlantic I know this is very much work in progress. I can't hope to emulate some of the wordsmiths or previous years but will do my best to chart the preparations from here on in. Looking forward the day it is ARC 2013 Day1 but much to do before then not least of which is having a functioning engine! Good luck to all and lets hope for safe passage to Gran Canaria at. read more...


18/03/2013

Silver Slipper - ARC 2013

Well it’s almost 8 months until we leave Las Palmas for St Lucia. This journey is the culmination of three years finding the right boat and preparing her for the sail across the pond. New rigging, new sails and all safety gear now purchased and installed. What’s next?   Well the boat is out of the water and  all we have to do now is prep the hull, prime and antifoul, replace the anodes and then a good clean and polish and we are ready to start the great adventure. Follow Wendy and I as we leave Brixham in early May and make a leisurely sail down to Las Palmas via the Channel Islands, Brittany, Spain, Portugal, Madeira and the Canary Islands. Joining us on our trip is our dog, Bumble, a 4 year old, Bearded Collie who just loves boats and will be writing her own blogs to. read more...


Capricorn - Es geht los ...
Capricorn - Es geht los ...
17/03/2013

Anastasia - Brazil to Grenada - The last day

12:02N 61:44W Having passed Tobago the wind started to veer to the east, forcing us to head slightly north to maintain an optimum wind angle.  Eventually we reached the decision point – turn south and head for Grenada or end up in St Lucia.  Turning south exposed the full deficiencies of our reefed mainsail and we had no option but to switch to the asymmetric spinnaker.  This gave us a speed almost identical to Gunvor and we both crossed the final 80 miles to Grenada on gradually converging paths.  We arrived at the southern tip of Grenada with Anastasia just 0.8 miles behind Gunvor.  At this point we had to round the corner and turn up into the wind.  With a full mainsail it might have remained close, but it was game over for a catamaran with two reefs. read more...


14/03/2013

Anastasia - Brazil to Grenada - Day 6

10:46N 059:03W  1530 miles covered, 180 to go We are nearly there now, we can almost smell the rum.  Our first sight of land will be Tobago which is 90 miles away, although we will pass it at about 3 am so all we will see are the lights.  We should get some acceleration around the northern tip because the north equatorial current flows quite strongly past Tobago. The wind has remained favourable and, apart from a few hours this morning, it has been blowing from the northeast at 16 to 18 knots.  That means we have the wind coming from 10 degrees behind the beam, which it just so happens is also Anastasia’s ideal wind angle.  So far we are just managing to keep pace with Gunvor, who are now in sight, three miles ahead of us. We had an interesting. read more...


13/03/2013

Anastasia - Brazil to Grenada - Day 5

08:31N 055:52W  1304 miles covered, 412 to go Another day, another 263 miles.  533 miles in two days.  We are out of the strong current (it is about 1 knot now) so the remainder of the trip will be slower, but we should still get in before sunset on Friday, all being well.  We now need to average 8.5 knots to get in at 18:00 Grenada time. The wind has been very kind, both in strength and angle, and we are still quite close to Gunvor.   I had a chat with Karsten over VHF this evening, so we are within about 20 miles of them.  We exchanged positions and I calculate they are about 5 miles closer to the finish line.  We have agreed that the first person to arrive will buy drinks for the other boat, so at least we will get free drinks on. read more...


12/03/2013

Anastasia - Brazil to Grenada - Day 4 (A new personal best)

06:16N 051:57W  1026 miles covered, 680 miles to go The wind direction is perfect for Anastasia, and with the current reaching 3 knots at times we are flying along, despite having a heavily reefed mainsail.  We generally consider 200 miles is a good distance to cover in one day but today we travelled 270 miles in 24 hours, averaging 11.25 knots, which is a new record for us. We hooked a Dorado, but at 12 knots there was just too much strain on the line and it got away before we could slow down and reel it in.  We passed the half way point last night and Andrea baked chocolate brownies to celebrate.  . read more...


11/03/2013

Anastasia - Brazil to Grenada - Day 3 (Ripped mainsail)

03:04N 047:16W  680 miles covered Today’s sad news is of the demise of our mainsail.  Last night the wind died away and veered to the south east, forcing us to turn dead downwind and goosewing the sails.  With the low wind, plus a current from behind, this meant that the mainsail would flog occasionally on the bigger waves.  It seemed quite gentle flogging at the time, but I guess with over a year of continual use the mainsail was in no condition to take the punishment and it ripped just below the second reefing point.   The good news is that we can still continue reasonably well on reef 2, just a knot or two slower then before.  The bad news obviously that we are out of the race to arrive first (and probably not second either) and also it is. read more...


Anastasia - Brazil to Grenada - Trompeta on the Start Line
Anastasia - Brazil to Grenada - Trompeta on the Start Line
Anastasia - Brazil to Grenada - Day 3 (Ripped mainsail)
Anastasia - Brazil to Grenada - Day 3 (Ripped mainsail)
10/03/2013

Anastasia - Brazil to Grenada - Day 2 (The Northern Hemisphere)

01:32N 045:22W  530 miles covered We crossed the equator last night and now we are are back in the Northern Hemisphere, with only about 1200 miles to go to Grenada.  Good wind, good current and we are speeding along at over 11 knots.  Currently my chartplotter is telling me it will take about 4 days and 4 hours to get there, but 6 days is a more realistic estimate.  We only need to average 8.4 knots now to hit our ETA target of 16:00 on the 16th. Andrea baked a cake today, to celebrate the equatorial crossing.  As is customary, we tossed a slice overboard for Neptune.  Unfortunately the SSB radio net was switched back to the 4 megahertz band and so we are already out of range of most of the fleet.  There are some boats with particularly. read more...


10/03/2013

Matilda - Mustique, Bequia, Tobago Cays and Saltwhistle Bay

9 MarchThe last night on Mustique was very special. We stayed on for the Sunday night jazz at Basil's, which turned out to be Jan, a very down to earth lady from Yorkshire and her partner, Louis. She had once come to Bequia on holiday, ended up staying and becoming a diving instructor and then landed the job of Social Director for Mustique (what a job!). Jan also played a pretty mean jazz saxophone with Louis on the keyboards. We got to Basil's early and ended up helping them set up after we were really taken with her dog called Stump (due to having not a lot of tail). Stump was a real character she clearly felt she was overseeing operations and I took it as a joke when she was described as the singer with the band. It turned out not to be joke at all because as soon as Jan played the. read more...


10/03/2013

Anastasia - Brazil to Grenada - Day 1

00:39S 041:55W  290 miles covered The fleet left Fortaleza at 12:00 yesterday on our final competitive leg of the World ARC.  The wind and current look good for the crossing and we are hoping to complete the 1700 miles in around 8 days.  Finding the areas of good current is crucial for this leg.  It should be possible to find 2 to 3 knots of current at the right distance from the Brazilian coast. The start was quite exciting because the planned committee vessel was unavailable, so Paul an Suzana headed out in an inflatable to do the start.  Their outboard broke down half way out and Paul asked for a volunteer to act as committee vessel, which we did.  We picked them up from the inflatable and got to the start line with 15 minutes to spare, time for. read more...


06/03/2013

Anastasia - Fortaleza

3:43.1S 038:31.8W The marina at Fortaleza is med-style, mooring being done stern to the pontoon with the anchor holding you off.  The problem is getting your anchor to hold in the slime.  We tried to lay our anchor twice, dragging it about 80 meters both times, and in the end we ran a shore line across to the seawall instead of using our anchor.  I dived to take a look and the anchor was happily sitting on its side in about two feet of slime, dragging nearer every time we pulled on it.  I guess it is just the wrong type of anchor for slime.  The shore line was obstructing other boats, but the marina staff attached a couple of lumps of iron to it to sink it and now the other boats can come and go just as if it was anchor chain. Today we went on a dune. read more...


Anastasia - Fortaleza
Anastasia - Fortaleza
03/03/2013

Matilda - Farewell Barbados, Hello Bequia, St Vincent and Mustique

The last few days in Barbados were quite interesting. The MacBook developed a problem and the only authorised fixer was on the other side of the island. As we no longer had a hire car we decided to take the local buses. There are 3 kinds of bus in Barbados, the official blue 'Government busses', the yellow private busses and the white private minivan-type busses. All fares going anywhere cost 2 Barbadian dollars (around 1 US). By far my favourite were the private yellow busses as, although they are noisy, the interiors and choice of music reflect the taste of the owners and they will pretty much stop for you and let you off anywhere you want to along the way. The government buses are fine, but a bit staid and officious, and the minivan ones are way too tightly packed for any sane person. read more...


02/03/2013

Anastasia - Fernando de Noronha

03:49.2S 032:24.5W Fernando de Noronha is a small island off the coast of Brazil, with a single anchorage that is described as being prone to swell.  We arrived at night and anchored on the outskirts of the main anchorage to wait for morning.  In the morning we found ourselves a sheltered place to anchor inside some big rocks that I thought should block the swell, but we got moved again by the port captain because the swell was predicted to be bad and would come straight over the rocks.  He told us to anchor as far out to sea as we could, so we moved to the centre of the bay and anchored in 21 metres of water. I was a bit nervous about starting the outboard on the tender because it has not been running well on Brazilian petrol and in Recife I had to flip an. read more...


Anastasia - Fernando de Noronha
Anastasia - Fernando de Noronha
Anastasia - Fernando de Noronha
Anastasia - Fernando de Noronha
Anastasia - Fernando de Noronha
Anastasia - Fernando de Noronha
27/02/2013

Anastasia - Recife

08:04.8S 034:53.3W The first thing that strikes you as you approach Recife is the huge expanse of high rise buildings.  Not huge buildings, mostly twenty stories or so, but they are not confined to any specific downtown area, spreading along the coast as far as the eye can see in both directions. m_P2242840[1] The harbour has a “rip rap” breakwater across the entrance, which makes it quite a confined space for big ships to manoeuvre.  We waited a little while to let a German navy vessel come out before entering (and Corinne posed for a photo m_P2232902[1]).   Most of the World ARC boats chose to anchor in the harbour outside the first yacht club you come to.  We decided to go up the river to a second yacht club, the Cabanga club, which has pontoon. read more...


Anastasia - Recife
Anastasia - Recife
Anastasia - Recife
Anastasia - Recife
Anastasia - Recife
Anastasia - Recife
Anastasia - Recife
Anastasia - Recife
25/02/2013

Matilda - Beautiful Barbados - Rum and Polo

We arrived safely in Barbados late afternoon on Tuesday 19th after 4 weeks to the day of sailing. We were feeling pretty pleased with ourselves until a few hours later a boat arrived with a group of 6 Brits and New Zealanders who had just ROWED across the Atlantic - certainly put our efforts in the shade. It was great sharing in their celebrations though. There is no mistaking where we are, the best rum punches ever and Rihanna on the radio 24/7.We spent the first night in a temporary berth surrounded by super-yachts, in fact one of them, Salute, had probably the largest mast and boom furler we have ever seen. We were told that the mainsail alone cost half a million US dollars - jeez! If we had arrived a few weeks earlier we would have apparently been parked next to Brangelina's yacht.. read more...


24/02/2013

At Last - New Blog Posts

At Last just updated their blog with more on St. Helena, our crossing to Brazil and our time at Carnival. Please visit the site at www.sailingatlast.com.. read more...


22/02/2013

Anastasia - Salvador to Recife

10:02S 035:30W For the past two days we have been slogging up the coast from Salvador to Recife.  The downside of making landfall in Salvador after crossing the Atlantic is that you then have to sail northeast up the Brazilian coast, against the prevailing east-northeasterly winds, which means you are beating into waves.  The problem is aggravated because close inshore there is a danger of encountering small unlit fishing boats at night, so we need to keep tacking out to sea to get off the continental shelf and into the deep water where there are no little boats. Heading into waves is not a great direction for Anastasia.  Because of our lightness and high freeboard we go over the top of waves, rather than diving into them, but if we are travelling at any speed. read more...


19/02/2013

Anastasia - Morro de Sao Paulo

13:23.3S 038:56.1W We spent two nights at anchor near Morro de Sao Paulo.  The only downside to the anchorage is that there is a stream of tourist boats that pass quite close by, but the location is beautiful and the town of S. Paulo is worth a visit.  It is only accessible by boat and so it has tiled streets and porters that are continually moving people’s luggage around in wheelbarrows.  It is touristy but in a quaint way.  The beaches are fringed by reefs that block the waves and create warm pools of water for swimming.    Sao Paulo also has a cliff with a land slide of supposedly therapeutic mud.  I am not convinced of the therapeutic properties but everybody got covered in mud just in case it made them look 20 years younger.  There. read more...


Anastasia - Morro de Sao Paulo
Anastasia - Morro de Sao Paulo
Anastasia - Morro de Sao Paulo
Anastasia - Morro de Sao Paulo
18/02/2013

Matilda - Tomorrow Barbados!

We should be arriving in Barbados late tomorrow afternoon (touch wood) after 4 weeks at sea to the day from St Helena- hurrah! We will have sailed around 5,350 nautical miles since leaving Cape Town on 5 January, with just a few days in St Helena and only 42.2 engine hours, so we are feeling quite proud of ourselves. Matilda has behaved beautifully with no real issues despite sometimes trying circumstances. Conditions over the past 48 hours have been superb so we are back in love with sailing, but still can't wait to get there. Its looking good that we will have a place in Barbados's only marina (that usually only takes superyachts - clearly times are hard everywhere).Life on board has been very routine, the highlight of the days being mealtimes where we have eaten very well, if rather. read more...


15/02/2013

Anastasia - Waterfalls and sandbanks

14:05.9S 39:01.1W For the past three days we have been cruising in the bay of Camamu.  The first couple of nights we spent anchored off Campinho, an island between the Marau river and the ocean. The local boats take tourists from the Campinho anchorage to the Barra Grande beach. m_P2132757[1] The third night we spent anchored off the town of Marau, in preparation for a trip up the river to the Tremenbe waterfalls. m_P2142763[1] Marau by day and  by night. m_P2142768[1]  This morning we set off up the river to the waterfall, armed with a diagram of the river from our Brazil cruising guide.  Not so much of a chart as a rough sketch.  We left Mr Blues anchored off Marau and both crews travelled on Anastasia, because our draft is only 1.3 metres. read more...


Anastasia - Waterfalls and sandbanks
Anastasia - Waterfalls and sandbanks
Anastasia - Waterfalls and sandbanks
Anastasia - Waterfalls and sandbanks
Anastasia - Waterfalls and sandbanks
Anastasia - Waterfalls and sandbanks
Anastasia - Waterfalls and sandbanks
Anastasia - Waterfalls and sandbanks
12/02/2013

Matilda - The Alternate World ARC Awards

8 Feb We are a few hours from arriving back at the Equator, but not much else been happening. The wind is reaching new levels of non co-operation and seems to want to give up the ghost completely. Yesterday it was either no knots and rain or 25 knots from all directions when squalls passed through. However the really sad part is that in the last 24 hours we have had to use the motor after sailing all the way from Cape Town (3,600 nautical miles!) with only 7 engine hours. We have just put the spinnaker up again, but it is a sorry sight in such light winds. Ah would you believe it, just as I am writing this, a bit of a bang and the spinnaker falls in the water. Fortunately with so little wind it wasn't too much of a problem to retrieve; we had been nervous of using our second spinnaker. read more...


11/02/2013

Anastasia - Salvador

12:58.3S 038:30.9W Salvador is a city on two levels, the port down by the sea and the main part of town at the top of a steep hill.  There is an elevator that links the two parts.  Our marina is a few hundred yards from the foot of the elevator, which makes it easy to get up into the main part of the city where you find most of the historic buildings and restaurants.  View of the boats moored at the foot of the elevator up to town. m_P2072666[1]  The World ARC provided a city tour, which gave us some background to Salvador and its history.  It was the capital of Brazil throughout during the time of slavery.  It has 365 churches, and we visited one amazingly ornate Franciscan monastery.The church at the Franciscan monastery m_P2072686[1]. read more...


Anastasia - Salvador
Anastasia - Salvador
Anastasia - Salvador
Anastasia - Salvador
Anastasia - Salvador
Anastasia - Salvador
Anastasia - Salvador
Anastasia - Salvador
Anastasia - Salvador
Anastasia - Salvador

Page 92 of 312  90 91 92 93 94 95 96 97 98 99 100 101 102 103 104 105 106 107 108 109 110 111